Philodendron McColley’s Finale vs. Prince of Orange (Differences and Similarities)

Philodendron McColley’s Finale vs. Prince of Orange difference is something many people ask. That’s because the two plants look very much alike.

They’re growth habits are similar. And they have colors leaves that stand out.

The stunning colors of their leaves is what make these two philodendron species popular especially for collectors.

So, to help you out in distinguishing the Philodendron McColley’s Finale from the Philodendron Prince of Orange and vice versa, I’ll take you through their differences and similarities below.

Philodendron McColley’s Finale vs. Prince of Orange Differences

In this section, I’ll go through the differences between the Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Philodendron Prince of Orange.

This will help you distinguish one from the other.

 

Appearance, Leaves and Colors

When it comes to Philodendron McColley’s Finale vs. Prince of Orange differences, the main points come down to the appearance of the plants.

Interestingly, they are both actually very similar plants.

However, they look quite different even if many people confuse one for the other because of their multitude of colors.

That said, if you look closely and observe, you’ll notice most of their differences lie in the way these two plants look.

I’ll begin differentiating Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Philodendron Prince of Orange by starting with the former.

The Philodendron McColley’s Finale is best known for its deep, darker colors.

It features many different colors because the leaves change colors as they age.

For this plant, young leaves start out with light brown, or dark orange colors. Some will call this cinnamon color even.

Then the leaves will start turning red. In many cases, they have a deep reddish hue or even scarlet color.

As the Philodendron McColley’s Finale’s leaves mature, they turn green.

The red to green transition is gradual. So, you’ll see some foliage that are a deep green red color.

But in the end, you’ll see a deeper green shade of leaves.

The most important thing to keep in mind here is that leaves emerge, unfurl, grow and mature then drop at different times.

This is why you’ll see many different leaf colors at the same time for the Philodendron McColley’s Finale. The difference in timing causes many leaf colors at any given time.

However, as the plant ages and gets older, you’ll see many leaves turn burgundy then dark green.

As for the Philodendron Prince of Orange, you’ll see many leaf colors as well at the same time.

However, the biggest differences are the colors of the leaves and the shades of these colors.

Basically, if you put the Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Philodendron Prince of Orange side by side, you’ll immediately notice that their colors are different.

The Philodendron McColley’s Finale will have deeper, darker shades of colors. This includes a deep green, brown, burgundy and so on.

Meanwhile the Philodendron Prince of Orange will have brighter shades.

It has a lighter shade of green, lime, orange, light olive and lighter brown. In fact, many people describe these are starburst colors, referring to the bright colors that the popular candy comes in.

This is the simplest way to identify the Philodendron Prince of Orange from the Philodendron McColley’s Finale. The shades of their colors.

One is deeper and darker, while the other one is generally brighter.

That said, the development and changes in the Philodendron Prince of Orange’s leaf colors also differ from that of the Philodendron McColley’s Finale.

For the Philodendron Prince of Orange, young leaves emerge as orange colored.

Some will describe it in more detail starting from yellow then turning more light bronze.

As the leaves unfurl, you’ll see seeing them change to different hues including pink, green, purple and a mix these as well.

Later on, the leaves will eventually settle on green as well.

But during the transitions between these color stages, you’ll see some hues that are in between as well.

Again, since leaves emerge at different times, you’ll see the Philodendron Prince of Orange have several colors at any one time.

The combinations of brown, green, lime, orange and light burgundy are what make this plant very attractive.

Interestingly, the stems are likewise very similar.

Both have purple-reddish stems. But as you look closely, once again the darker shade of stems will go to the Philodendron McColley’s Finale while the Philodendron Prince of Orange has a brighter shade of purple-red stems.

 

Rarity

When it comes to Philodendron Prince of Orange vs. Philodendron McColley’s Finale, one is rarer than the other.

From my experience the Philodendron Prince of Orange is a rare plant that’s not as easy to find. On the other hand, the Philodendron McColley’s Finale is actually quite common.

Although, I do know some gardeners who will argue with me on the second point.

That’s because how common the Philodendron McColley’s Finale is depends a lot on where you live or where you’re looking.

In some areas of the United States, the Philodendron McColley’s Finale is fairly common. But not so much in other areas.

That said, if you have a hard time finding others, I highly suggest looking at Southeast Asia.

I travel there at least once a year.

And in countries like the Philippines, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia, many of the rare plants in the U.S. are quite common there.

You’ll see lots of growers growing them in their plots in small pots by the dozens in rows.

If you don’t have the time to travel there, search online.

Many online Southeast Asian shops will ship these plants online.

But from experience, make sure to do your research and only go with more reputable ones.

Some will charge you much more while others won’t. The honest growers actually sell a lot of the rare, expensive plants very at very cheap prices there. Seriously, you won’t believe the difference.

This is why I always check my Southeast Asian contacts and growers before I look at any western online plant shop if I’m looking for rare, uncommon or expensive plants.

 

Size

When it comes to size, the Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Prince of Orange are somewhat similar. But they are not completely alike.

Both plants are relatively small when compared to other Philodendron varieties.

They are likewise self-heading.

So, the two will grow more like shrubs than most large Philodendron species.

Another thing that you’ll notice is that both Philodendron McColley’s Finale and the Philodendron Prince of Orange have relatively large leaves compared to the size of the plant themselves.

For example, the Philodendron McColley’s Finale will reach a mature size between 2 to 3 feet high.

Although, it can sometimes pass 3 feet in height if it gets a lot of light which increases its growth.

That said, it isn’t going to go up much higher than that.

The plant will also have a spread of around 2 feet. This is due to its large leaves.

Its leaves will reach 5 to 8 inches long and 5 to 6 inches wide. This makes relatively big compared to the overall size of the plant.

On the other hand, the Philodendron Prince of Orange usually maxes out at 2 feet high.

As such, it is a smaller plant.

And this makes it easier to grow at home especially if you want to be able to keep it above the floor.

Another interesting similarity is that both plants are hybrids. And they were created at different times and places by different people.

But in both instances, the goal was the same.

That is, to produce colorful plants that are unique and different from other philodendron species.

From the looks of the two plants and how much their colors are sought after, I’d say that the creators were successful, wouldn’t you?

 

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Hardiness and Climate Zones

Another minor difference between the Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Philodendron Prince of Orange is their climate preference.

In general, they both love consistently warm weather where the sun is out, and the temperature stays moderate to warm.

However, the difference is in the hardness zones.

The Philodendron McColley’s Finale is more winter hardy compared to the Philodendron Prince of Orange.

Note that the difference is not big.

But it is enough that the Philodendron McColley’s Finale can be grown in USDA Hardiness Zones 9 to 11. This is because it can tolerate slightly colder temperatures during the winter.

On the other hand, the Philodendron Prince of Orange best grows outdoors in USDA Hardiness Zones 10 and 11.

As I’ve mentioned this is a minor difference.

And in both cases, it is best to keep them out of the winter cold. If you live somewhere with frost, snow or freezing conditions during winter, it is best to keep the plant indoors where you can control the temperature.

 

Soil / Potting Mix

Here’s another minor difference.

And in all honesty, after having grown both plants, I can tell you that you don’t need to be over choosy here.

But since we’re doing a Philodendron McColley’s Finale vs. Prince of Orange article, it is worth mentioning this slight difference.

In general, the Philodendron McColley’s Finale prefers consistently moist soil. But avoid letting it stay wet.

It needs well-draining soil that has good amounts of organic matter.

The extra nutrients are important especially if you want the plant to produce its stunning colors.

On the other hand, the Philodendron Prince of Orange thrives in loose, well-draining soil that is rich or fertile.

Like I said, the difference is miniscule.

However, the most important thing for both these plants is that like other Aroids, they do not like staying in water for long periods of time.

Therefore, good drainage is very important.

And because both feature beautiful colors, it is a good idea to make sure that the soil you use is enriched with organic matter content which will allow them to maintain their unique colors.

 

Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Prince of Orange Similarities

In this next section, I’ll go through the similarities between Philodendron McColley’s Finale and the Philodendron Prince of Orange.

You’ll notice that the two plants have a lot in common.

This is one reason that it is easy to confuse them for one another.

 

Growth Habit

First off, both Philodendron McColley’s Finale and the Prince of Orange are both self-heading philodendrons.

As such, they differ from most philodendron species which are epiphytic climbers.

This is why they’ll grow in the ground and look like small shrubs.

Their large leaves will spread out from the center.

Their self-heading nature also makes them perfect for growing in containers. And you don’t need to give them a pole to climb on.

Of course, they will grow very well in the ground as well.

 

Propagating the Plant

Another similarity between the Philodendron Prince of Orange and the Philodendron McColley’s Finale is that the propagate fairly easily.

Both can be propagated from stem cuttings.

This makes it easy and free to produce more of both plants at home. Plus, you don’t need any special tools or equipment to do so.

To propagate both plants, take healthy stem cuttings with at least a few leaves.

The most important thing is to ensure each cutting has as least 1-2 nodes.

You can propagate the cuttings in water or soil. Both methods work and will let the cuttings root quite well.

It usually takes a month or so for the cutting to root.

 

Light Requirements

Light is essential for both plants. And they both want plenty of light.

But avoid too much intense light as this can damage their gorgeous leaves. Therefore, don’t place them under direct sunlight.

Instead, keep both the Philodendron McColley’s Finale and Prince of Orange under bright, indirect light.

They need at least 6 hours of light per day. This will allow them to grow optimally and maintain their best colors.

Avoid low light as this will make their colors dull and less prominent.

Outdoors, keep both away from full sun. Instead, they do best in partial or slight shade.

 

Temperature

Both Philodendron Prince of Orange and Philodendron McColley’s Finale will thrive in tropical climate conditions.

This means they enjoy temperatures between 60 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

But for optimal growth, they do best when temperature is kept between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Avoid very cold and very hot conditions. But of the two, the cold is more dangerous.

In fact, the plants won’t have a problem in 95 degrees weather.

I’ve seen them thrive in this weather in Southeast Asia without any problem day in and day out especially since the tropical Asian summers are brutal.

But try to avoid anything above 95 degrees if possible.

While they can tolerate this, they can easily get dehydrated.

The most dangerous thing about temperature is the cold and frost.

Therefore, avoid anything below 50 degrees Fahrenheit. This will cause both these philodendron plants to struggle.

Frost will cause cold damage. So, avoid that by all means.

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